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ID scanners keep banned troublemakers away

07 October, 2014

ID scanners at high risk venues in Sydney's Kings Cross are serving their purpose in keeping banned troublemakers out and away from the precinct, according to Minister for Hospitality, Troy Grant.

"Since the ID scanners were introduced on 13 June more than 415,000 scans of patron IDs have occurred," Grant said in a recent statement.

"In three months they have proven to be an effective deterrent.

"The vast majority of banned troublemakers have got the message and are staying away with only five being caught at the door by the ID scanners since inception.

Central system alerts staff, police

"The ID scanners are linked to a central system and alert venue staff and police if a patron attempts to enter while on a temporary or long-term banning order.

"With the arrival of spring and the busy summer months ahead, it is positive to see the ID scanners working effectively to keep troublemakers away."

Grant said there are 35 Kings Cross venues that are required to operate ID scanners when trading between 9pm and 1.30am. Those venues trade after midnight and have a capacity of more than 120 patrons.

"The ID system captures the name, date of birth, address and photograph from the ID," Grant said.

Banning orders

"This information is not accessible by venue staff and is only used by police to investigate alleged offences and enforce banning orders.

"Currently 98 people are subject to long-term banning orders across the Kings Cross and Sydney CBD precincts, and 175 people have been issued with temporary banning orders in the Kings Cross precinct.

"The message is clear, if you are banned – stay away or else you will face fines up to $11,000.

"The Government will assess the effectiveness of the ID scanners in Kings Cross after 12 months.

"In another measure, the NSW Government has also launched an alcohol advertising campaign encouraging people to Stop before it gets ugly.

"Industry and individuals need to take responsibility and ensure people can enjoy their night out in safety," Grant said.